Category: Finances and the Financial Neutral

We blog about helping Long Island families to resolve conflicts in the most productive ways possible.

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber are breaking up.  As Hollywood icons, do they know something the rest of the divorcing population should consider?  Watts and Schreiber in announcing their breakup jointly said “It is with great love, respect and friendship in our hearts that we look forward to raising our […]

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In his April, 2016 column for Forbes, Avoid the Financial Pitfalls of Divorce, Certified Financial Planner Michael F. Kay notes that financial planning at the time of divorce may be “the key to safely navigating this life transition.” He also notes that  good financial decision-making and emotions rarely mix well. Divorce litigation does not generally […]

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The Collaborative Divorce process makes anything possible if the two parties can agree.  Remember, you always want to have your attorney’s input and guidance in the decision making process. A Collaborative Divorce generally takes less time than a litigated settlement. The speediness of action is facilitated by openness, the sharing of information, and the desire […]

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Question: “We’re not divorced yet. How can I control my portion of the marital assets?” Answer: One of the stickiest aspects of a divorce, and often the greatest point of contention, is the separation of financial assets. The beauty of choosing the Collaborative Divorce process is that the decisions made between the soon-to-be ex-spouses are […]

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The tax return presents a useful view of a year in time of the family’s finances. In the Collaborative Divorce process, the attorney for one of the divorcing parties and/or a Neutral Financial Specialist often request three years of tax returns to begin to take a financial look at the family. The Neutral Financial Specialist […]

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Divorce is typically wrought with extreme emotional and financial turbulence. In particular, the histories that bound couples, families, friends and home life are disrupted. Standards of living are often changed, not just for spouses but for the children as well. And what once appeared to be a clear financial path to the future is now […]

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Q 1. She Asks: Our marriage isn’t working, neither of us knows where to begin, and we don’t want to upset the children – but we’re not happy. Any suggestions? A 1. A good start is that you keep talking to each other and agree to find an arrangement that works for the entire family. […]

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Divorce is typically wrought with extreme emotional and financial turbulence. In particular, the histories that bound couples, families, friends and home life are disrupted. Standards of living are often changed, not just for spouses, but for the children as well. What once appeared to be a clear financial path to the future is now a rocky […]

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One method of calculating child support in a divorce is provided by New York laws. Basic Child Support is calculated by a statutory (DRL §240[1-b]) formula in New York. The formula has complex aspects which must be explained by your attorney, but in essence, the non-residential parent (who we will call the “payor”) must pay […]

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