Category: Emotions and the Family Specialist

We blog about helping Long Island families to resolve conflicts in the most productive ways possible.

One of the worst outcomes in a divorce is when a child resists or refuses to be with one of the parents. To be rejected by your child is horrible. It creates a tremendous amount of anguish in the rejected parent and research has shown that, in the long run, the rejecting child will suffer […]

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Being divorced is universally recognized as one of the most stressful events in a person’s life. This stress can show up as anger, a sense of loss, or some other emotion, and these emotions often present hidden roadblocks to an effective settlement. I represented a husband recently in a litigated divorce. Through some intense negotiations […]

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Litigation may be the worst way to successfully transition from an intact family to a divorced family. Very often during litigation, there is minimal interaction between the spouses (and they are probably very happy about that); leaving negotiations, or more adversarial procedures to the attorneys and the judge. As difficult as it may be, bringing […]

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Experienced practitioners of Collaborative Divorce understand the important contributions made by a Family Specialist (also called a “Divorce Coach”) during the process. They maintain a respectful tone, facilitate communications, counsel couples about parenting plans that cater to a child’s developmental requirements, the needs and well-being of their family, assist with co-parenting issues, and manage the […]

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Tom and Alice waited until their last child was in her twenties before deciding that it was time to divorce.  They joined the growing trend of couples who divorce after a lengthy marriage. Unfortunately, the children did not take the news as calmly as Alice and Tom had anticipated. Their eldest refused to talk to […]

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Q: How can I ensure that my spouse doesn’t verbally insult or abuse me in the Collaborative Divorce team meetings? A: Your Collaborative Divorce team will include a mental health professional, referred to as a Neutral Family Specialist (“NFS”), who is specially trained to help spouses agree and adhere to explicit rules of collaborative conduct.  […]

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In her March 6, 2016, blog post, Co-Parents Forever: 12 tips to raising healthy children after divorce, Tampa Florida collaborative attorney Joryn Jenkins’ first tip is: You can’t really co-parent until you’re done getting divorced. People don’t always decide at exactly the same time to get divorced. If you’re both done before you get that final […]

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It has been said that divorce makes sane people act crazy. This is because the dynamics or pressures of a divorce push normal emotions to the extreme. A divorce is expected to create feelings of separation and loss in people. Also, we realize that the expectations we had in the beginning of the relationship will […]

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When couples fall in love and marry, they expect it to be forever. However, far too many marriages end in divorce and children become collateral damage in a divorce war. Although divorce causes stress and prompts painful emotions, it does not have to mean the end of the family. It merely signals changes in the […]

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