Category: Children and Parenting Issues

We blog about helping Long Island families to resolve conflicts in the most productive ways possible.

One of the worst outcomes in a divorce is when a child resists or refuses to be with one of the parents. To be rejected by your child is horrible. It creates a tremendous amount of anguish in the rejected parent and research has shown that, in the long run, the rejecting child will suffer […]

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Being with your children becomes much more complex after a divorce. When time will the children be with you, and when will the children be with your ex-spouse? How do you want to deal with these issues? Will you and your ex-spouse make the plans or are you going to leave decisions like these to […]

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Experienced practitioners of Collaborative Divorce understand the important contributions made by a Family Specialist (also called a “Divorce Coach”) during the process. They maintain a respectful tone, facilitate communications, counsel couples about parenting plans that cater to a child’s developmental requirements, the needs and well-being of their family, assist with co-parenting issues, and manage the […]

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Tom and Alice waited until their last child was in her twenties before deciding that it was time to divorce.  They joined the growing trend of couples who divorce after a lengthy marriage. Unfortunately, the children did not take the news as calmly as Alice and Tom had anticipated. Their eldest refused to talk to […]

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Most parents are concerned about how a divorce will affect their children. Current research on this topic indicates that: The ending of a marital relationship does create stress in families. Stress contributors include the parents’ own stress, reduced parenting capacity, impending family relocation, and economic instability. The good news is that most of these have […]

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The parents of Amy* (age 14) and Nick* (age 10) are using the Collaborative Divorce process. Putting a Child Specialist on the collaborative team was suggested because of the parents’ disagreement over Amy’s and Nick’s needs. Mom thought Dad was too indulgent and not attentive enough to safety. She insisted on meeting all of Amy’s […]

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How do children view their parents’ divorce? Certainly, this depends on the age of the child. However, their view also reflects the amount of conflict between the parents, before, during and after the divorce. I have worked with many children whose parents have divorced. They have related their stories to me. Children of all ages […]

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When parties divorce, they oftentimes think that their troubles are over. What they really may find out is that their troubles might just be starting. Without proper planning and coordination, the results of a divorce may create more issues post-divorce than the parties experienced during their marriage. If a couple chooses to divorce using the […]

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You are getting divorced, but do you really want a judge telling you how to raise your children? Robert Emery, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Children, Families and the Law at the University of Virginia, focuses a light on this issue in his New York Times Opinion piece “How Divorced Parents […]

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